Where can I go for more help with Design Thinking?

This blogpost is the fourth in a series of five where I intend on exploring Design Thinking in an education context. I want to come back to the questions we have about design thinking when we’re first starting out. I want to think about what design thinking is, why we might use design thinking, how we can use design thinking in schools, where to go for resources and help, and finally, how design thinking can transform our schools.

Okay, so the watchword for this blogpost is curation. We’ve begun by thinking about what design thinking actually is, why I think it’s important to use in education – silver bullet, people! – and the variety of ways design thinking can be used in an education context. For those of you on this design thinking journey with me, this post is really just a list of my favourite ‘go to’ places.

Firstly, when people want to get started with design thinking, I often show this quick clip from Daylight on what design thinking is. It’s a useful introduction with reference to a particular product that was designed and made. But I personally think the best way to learn what design thinking is, is by getting hands-on and stuck into a design thinking challenge. So, here’s the d. School in Stanford’s “crash course” in design thinking, and embedded below is a presentation I gave late last year to a group of principals interested in learning about design thinking:

If people are readers and want to explore the concept of design thinking, my favourite article is this one by Tim Brown and Jocelyn Wyatt. I find this research by Swee Hong Kwek useful too. In last week’s post I recommended Grant Lichtman’s #EdJourney and Ewan McIntosh’s How to Come Up with Great Ideas and Actually Make them Happen. Grant’s blog is also one to subscribe to.

For people wanting to see the different ways the process of design thinking can be expressed, I start with the “biggies” of design thinking: IDEO, d. School and notosh. I also suggest these models as being of particular use to teachers, or that have education-specific resources: Mary Cantwell’s DeepDT, Frog Design’s Collective Action Toolkit, and IDEO’s design thinking for educators. This latter site also has a great downloadable toolkit, as well as short videos to watch and spark inspiration.

When you want to get practical with “stuff” you can just use in the classroom tomorrow, I don’t think you can go past this great collection of design thinking resources collated by Thomas Riddle in a Livebinder. I found it super-handy when I created my first design thinking-inspired unit. And the d. School K-12 Lab Wiki also has excellent resources – I use their downloadable images a lot.

And finally, for those who want to connect with other like-minded design thinking educators, I always point them in the direction of Steve Mouldey, particularly as he’s a local Kiwi educator; and also, for those on Twitter, the #dtk12chat. Like me, Steve was a CORE Education eFellow in 2015, and he also conducted some research into design thinking. I recommend a read of this blogpost, as he inquired into the impact of design thinking from a student’s perspective.

What else have you uncovered/discovered on your design thinking journey? Please suggest other nifty resources in the comments below:

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