Digital Citizenship

Cue: groan.

This definitely used to be my knee-jerk response to this ‘hot-button’ issue.  In the past few days I have been re-visiting this concept, aided by some really thoughtful blogs which I’ll share further down.

Digital citizenship has been dominated, and almost become entirely synonymous with, cybersafety.  Teachers have thought that essentially we could scare kids into behaving themselves on the Internet.  Hmmm.  That’s worked well.  I would perhaps make an sweeping generalisation and guess that most schools’ Acceptable User Policies (AUPs) have focused primarily on this.  They become akin to a list of ‘do nots’ or commandments, for example: thou shall not take photos without permission; thou shall not use social media on your devices during lesson time; thou shall not bully or harass others online (or off!); thou shall not share passwords or logins with others.

Now, cybersafety is a really important issue and I’m not belittling it at all.  All users of technology and the Internet should follow appropriate codes of practice.  But.  As the video by John Fenaughty below rightly points out, this approach is very much in an ‘old school’ model – lecturing from the top down.  It is a model largely divorced from values/purpose/the ‘why’.

So, just like everything else that I seem to blog about, a shift is needed.  A shift to a broader, more genuine idea of citizenship.  One that not just about laws but about contribution.  Not just about taking but giving.  Not just about obeying but respecting.

This is an idea beautifully explored here by ‘Miss D’.

What often frustrates me with the reading and researching that I do in my quest for future learning is that people are very good about defining and describing, and passionately conveying to me why I should care (and it works – I do!), but not necessarily that good at giving concrete ‘how to’ suggestions.

A ha!  Enter this wonderful blog post by Holly Clark which, I think, offers an excellent, accessible ‘how to’ model.

Ultimately, I agree that we need to adjust the cybersafety lens to incorporate a view of considering our online ‘brand’, our reputation, alongside how to be a positive contributor to the (online) world.  This is a shift that engages in ‘real world’ terms which are accessible and easy to relate to – by learners/ako of all kinds.

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